Charlotte HIV/AIDS Testing

Testing and treatment options for HIV can be found through STD Testing Charlotte. When testing, we use the HIV Antibody Test to effectively determine if you have been exposed to HIV recently. As HIV has become more common, new treatment methods including highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have been created to help patients. If you live in the Charlotte and Mecklenburg county areas, you deserve stress-free STD testing and treatment.

HIV/AIDS facts and stats

247

Based on data from the CDC, it's estimated that about 247 new cases of HIV will be reported in the Charlotte area in 2015

2 of 3

It's estimate that roughly two thirds of HIV reports were infections in men who have sex with other men.

202%

It's estimated that in 2015, the number of reported cases of HIV could be up to 202% larger than the number of reported cases of syphilis, another commonly found STD in the Charlotte and Mecklenburg areas.

247

Based on data from the CDC, it's estimated that about 247 new cases of HIV will be reported in the Charlotte area in 2015

2 of 3

It's estimate that roughly two thirds of HIV reports were infections in men who have sex with other men.

202%

It's estimated that in 2015, the number of reported cases of HIV could be up to 202% larger than the number of reported cases of syphilis, another commonly found STD in the Charlotte and Mecklenburg areas.

HIV/AIDS Frequently Asked Questions

HIV Basics

What are the early signs of HIV?

The HIV virus infects and destroys CD4 cells in your body, which make up your immune system. The early signs of HIV infection are often vague, and can sometimes will go unnoticed like other STDs. Patients who have HIV often describe symptoms to be similar to the flu, which can include:

  1. Fever
  2. Swollen lymph nodes
  3. Sore throat
  4. Skin rash
  5. Muscle soreness
  6. Fatigue


Sometimes, these symptoms can be confused for other conditions or diseases. This can cause people to not be aware that they are infected with HIV; and why it's extremely important to get tested to make sure that you do not have the infection.

What is HIV?

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) weakens the immune system, making it harder to fight off infections. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are more than 56,000 new HIV infections in the United States every year. About 1.1 million people are infected and living with the virus; and unfortunately, one in five of people with HIV have not been tested and diagnosed, and are therefore not receiving proper treatment to manage its damaging effects.

The HIV is transmitted through unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sex when the blood, semen or vaginal secretions of an infected partner enter your body. Although rare, you can also get HIV from blood transfusions, or by sharing needles or syringes that are contaminated with infected blood. Additionally, infected mothers run the risk of transmitting HIV to their babies during pregnancy, delivery or while breastfeeding.

How is HIV spread?

You cannot get HIV through everyday contact with people who are infected with the virus or through contact with their urine, sweat, tears, coughs or sneezes. And you cannot get HIV by "dry" kissing an infected person but we recommend that you avoid deep kissing, especially if there are cuts or sores in the mouth.

You cannot get HIV from mosquitoes, toilet seats, eating utensils, phones, or the like.

What if I have HIV and I'm pregnant?

HIV can typically be treated during pregnancy, if detected early, to reduce the potential risks to your baby. Consult your regular doctor about the risks involved, and to identify a treatment that's best for you and your baby.

HIV & AIDS

What else should I know about AIDS?

From a medical definition, AIDS only develops when CD4 levels drop below 200 cells per milliliter of blood. When the body's immune system is weakened, a person who has AIDS develops what is known as "opportunistic infections." These are diseases that typically don't affect people who have healthy and strong immune systems; and are often the cause of death for many people with AIDS.. These "opportunistic infections" include Kaposi's sarcoma, lymphomas (cancers of the immune system), tuberculosis, Pneumocystis pneumonia, and many other bacterial and fungal infections.

When does HIV advance to AIDS?

During the acute stages of HIV, there might be a long period without symptoms where an infected person may feel "normal" again and remain unaware of their infection. Although this person feels normal, HIV will continue to damage their immune system if the infection is left untreated. The immune system can be weakened to the point where AIDS develops. The time in which HIV develops AIDS is different from person to person, but this typically happens over a period of years.

Does HIV always lead to AIDS?

Not always. Not everyone with HIV will develop an AIDS condition. AIDS typically only develops during advanced stages of HIV, if the infected person does not get treatment or take their course of treatment as directed. For this reason, it's important to get tested, which will allow you to catch the infection early before AIDS develops.

Is there a difference between HIV and AIDS?

Many people use the terms HIV and AIDS interchangeably, but they are different conditions. HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a viral infection and AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) is a condition that occurs in the later stages of HIV if the virus is not treated. Treatment in the early stages of HIV can prevent AIDS. HIV can be deadly because it weakens a persons immune system, leaving them susceptible to other infections from viruses, bacteria, or other "bugs."

HIV Testing

How can I get tested for HIV?

We make getting tested for HIV simple by offering the HIV Antibody Test. It is safe, reliable and easy (no undressing or swabbing required). Just one fast blood draw and you're on your way. The HIV Antibody Test is the most common detector for HIV-1 and HIV-2. This test looks for antibodies of the viruses in the blood and has an accuracy rate of 99% after the testing window has expired.

We also offer testing with the HIV Early Detection Test
which can detect the HIV virus sooner, if you are worried about a recent exposure.

What are my options for treatment If I test positive of HIV?"

If you test result returns positive for HIV, treatment options are available. One of the most common forms of treatment is called highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Through treatments like HAART, patients are able to maintain a good quality of life for as long as possible. Most patients start treatment options immediately after testing positive for HIV.

Concerned about HIV/AIDS

Hassle-Free STD Testing, Designed For You

Get tested for 8 of the most common STDs

  • Chlamydia
  • Herpes 1
  • Gonorrhea
  • Herpes 2
  • Syphilis
  • HIV
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C

Affordable pricing and flexible payment methods

Cost of STD testing

The cost of testing depends on the tests recommended for you, the location of the lab and the payment method you choose.

Pay out-of-pocket

Payment can be made using credit, debit, HSA and FSA cards. We also accept major insurance plans.

Need more information about payment options?

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